Interstate 95 in New Jersey

Route map:
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Interstate 95 marker

Interstate 95

Map
I-95 highlighted in red and the Western Spur highlighted in blue
Route information
Maintained by NJTA and PANYNJ
Length97.76 mi[1][2][3] (157.33 km)
Existed1959–present
NHSEntire route
Main section
Length77.96 mi[2] (125.46 km)
South end
Major intersections
North end I-95 / US 1 / US 9 at the New York state line on the George Washington Bridge
Western Spur
Length11.03 mi[3] (17.75 km)
South end
Major intersections
North end
Location
CountryUnited States
StateNew Jersey
CountiesBurlington, Mercer, Middlesex, Union, Essex, Hudson, Bergen
Highway system
Route 94 Route 100
I-676I-695 Route 700

Interstate 95 (I-95) is a major Interstate Highway that runs along the East Coast of the United States from Miami, Florida, north to the Canada–United States border at Houlton, Maine. In New Jersey, it runs along much of the mainline of the New Jersey Turnpike (exit 6 to exit 18), as well as the Pearl Harbor Memorial Turnpike Extension (formerly and still commonly known as the Pennsylvania Turnpike Connector; from exit 6 to the Delaware River–Turnpike Toll Bridge), and the New Jersey Turnpike's I-95 Extension (from exit 18) to the George Washington Bridge for a total of 77.96 miles (125.46 km). Located in the northeastern part of the state near New York City, the 11.03-mile (17.75 km) Western Spur of the New Jersey Turnpike, considered to be Route 95W by the New Jersey Department of Transportation (NJDOT), is also part of I-95.

I-95 enters the state from the Pennsylvania Turnpike on the Delaware River–Turnpike Toll Bridge, following the length of the Pearl Harbor Memorial Turnpike Extension to exit 6 on the New Jersey Turnpike mainline, continuing north along the remainder of the latter road to U.S. Route 46 (US 46), where it continues as the turnpike's I-95 extension to the George Washington Bridge, on which it enters New York. All of I-95 in New Jersey is maintained by the New Jersey Turnpike Authority (NJTA) except for the George Washington Bridge, which is maintained by the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey (PANYNJ).

Until 2018, I-95 had been discontinuous within New Jersey. From Pennsylvania, I-95 entered New Jersey on the Scudder Falls Bridge and ended at US 1 in Lawrence Township, where the freeway then turned south as I-295. From New York, I-95 continued from the George Washington Bridge southward along the New Jersey Turnpike and west along the Pearl Harbor Memorial Turnpike Extension to end at the Pennsylvania state line, where I-276 continued into that state along the Pennsylvania Turnpike. This discontinuity was caused by the 1983 cancelation of the Somerset Freeway, which would have connected the former Trenton segment of I-95 in Hopewell Township northeast to I-287 in Piscataway. From here, I-95 would have followed present-day I-287 to exit 10 on the New Jersey Turnpike in Edison.

In order to fill the gap, the Pennsylvania Turnpike/Interstate 95 Interchange Project saw the construction of an interchange between the Pennsylvania Turnpike and I-95 in Bristol Township, Pennsylvania, with I-95 being rerouted to use the Pennsylvania Turnpike to the Delaware River–Turnpike Toll Bridge. By March 2018, the former I-95 around the north side of Trenton to just across the Scudder Falls Bridge in Pennsylvania became an extension of I-295, with I-295 extended to the interchange by July of the same year. On September 22, 2018, the ramps connecting I-95 and the Pennsylvania Turnpike opened, allowing a direct freeway route from Philadelphia to New York City and finally completing I-95 as a whole.

Route description[edit]

Pearl Harbor Memorial Turnpike Extension[edit]

Pearl Harbor Memorial Turnpike Extension of the New Jersey Turnpike (I-95) at the interchange with the New Jersey Turnpike mainline in Mansfield Township

I-95 enters New Jersey at the Delaware River–Turnpike Toll Bridge over the Delaware River in Burlington Township, Burlington County, where the road continues west (south) into Pennsylvania as the Pennsylvania Turnpike.[2][4] From the river, I-95 follows the six-lane Pearl Harbor Memorial Turnpike Extension of the New Jersey Turnpike east into New Jersey. Continuing east through a mix of fields and warehouses into Florence Township, the highway passes over NJ Transit's River Line and has an interchange serving US 130.[2][5] This interchange has a toll plaza on the ramp to southbound I-95. After this interchange, the road comes to a toll barrier that marks the beginning of the turnpike ticket system northbound and the end of the ticket system southbound.[5][6] The Pearl Harbor Memorial Turnpike Extension crosses into Mansfield Township and passes under I-295 before merging into the mainline of the New Jersey Turnpike at exit 6.[2]

New Jersey Turnpike mainline[edit]

View north along the New Jersey Turnpike in Mansfield Township, Burlington County

Mansfield Townships to Newark[edit]

At this point, I-95 continues northeast on the mainline of the New Jersey Turnpike, with 12 lanes featuring six inner lanes exclusively for cars separated from six outer lanes for cars, trucks, and buses.[2][7] It soon reaches an exit for US 206 in Bordentown Township. Continuing north through mostly rural areas, the road heads into Mercer County and comes to the I-195 interchange in Robbinsville Township. In East Windsor, I-95 reaches the exit for Route 133/Route 33, located to the east of Hightstown.[2][5] Heading into Middlesex County, development near the highway increases.[5][8] At this point, an interchange serves Route 32 in Monroe Township.[2] Continuing north into more dense suburban development, I-95 intersects Route 18 in East Brunswick near the city of New Brunswick.[2][5] After crossing the Raritan River, the New Jersey Turnpike heads northeast to the I-287/Route 440 junction in Edison. In Woodbridge Township, the highway comes to a large interchange accessing both the Garden State Parkway and US 9.[2] From this point, the road enters areas of heavy industry and comes to the County Route 602 (CR 602) exit in Carteret. In Union County, I-95 comes to the I-278 exit on the border of Linden and Elizabeth at the western approach to the Goethals Bridge. In the northern part of Elizabeth, the New Jersey Turnpike comes to Route 81 which provides access to Newark Liberty International Airport before the road runs to the east of the airport. After the airport, I-95 intersects I-78 in Newark, Essex County.[2][5] At US 1/9 Truck, the New Jersey Turnpike splits into two alignments and enters the New Jersey Meadowlands.[2][4][5]

View north along what the NJDOT refers to as Route 95W, the Western Spur (or "Western Alignment" as the NJDOT refers to it as) of the New Jersey Turnpike, one mile (1.6 km) south of exit 16W

Kearny to Ridgefield Park[edit]

After both the western and eastern spurs cross the Passaic River on the Harry Laderman and Chaplain Washington Bridges, the mainline of I-95 officially follows the Eastern Spur of the New Jersey Turnpike, which has exits to I-280 in Kearny, Hudson County, and the Secaucus Junction train station and Route 3/Route 495 in Secaucus, where it reaches the end of the ticket system.[2][6] The Western Spur of the New Jersey Turnpike is also signed as I-95 but is officially known as Route 95W.[3] This road has interchanges serving I-280 in Kearny and Route 3 in East Rutherford, Bergen County, the latter connecting to Route 120 and CR 503, serving the Meadowlands Sports Complex.[3][5] The ticket system on the Western Spur ends at a barrier in Carlstadt, following which the road comes to a northbound exit and southbound exit and entrance for the Meadowlands Sports Complex and the American Dream Meadowlands shopping and entertainment complex.[3][6] In Ridgefield, the two segments of the New Jersey Turnpike merge again, with the road continuing north into Ridgefield Park.[2][4]

Northbound view along the western and eastern spurs of the turnpike as they rise to cross the Passaic River, as seen from the Pulaski Skyway

George Washington Bridge approach[edit]

Sign welcoming drivers to the New Jersey Turnpike under the Edgewood Road Bridge

In Ridgefield Park, I-95 continues north as a toll-free highway cosigned with the New Jersey Turnpike and maintained by the NJTA.[2][9] This section of the Turnpike from this point to the George Washington Bridge approach is designated the “I-95 Extension” of the Turnpike, and unofficially also part of the nicknamed “Bergen-Passaic Expressway,” along with I-80.[10] It has a large interchange serving US 46, part of which was the original northern terminus of the turnpike before it was extended.[2] From this point, it has the appearance of a local–express lane configuration carrying three local lanes and two express lanes (3–2–2–3) in each direction, but the northbound "express" lane only leads exclusively to I-80 west while the northbound local lanes continues as the main trunk of I-95. (On the southbound side, the "express" lanes function as the main trunk of I-95 south while the southbound local lanes lead exclusively from I-80 east.) The road runs near suburban neighborhoods before entering Teaneck and intersecting with the eastern terminus of I-80. From here, I-95 turns northeast and splits into an actual local–express lane configuration with a 3–2–2–3 lane count, soon interchanging with CR 56 as it passes northwest of Overpeck County Park. The highway turns east as it skirts the border between Englewood to the north and Leonia to the south. After crossing CSX Transportation's Northern Branch, the highway enters inhabited areas as it passes over Route 93/CR 501 (Grand Avenue) and has a northbound exit and southbound entrance serving Broad Avenue.[2][5] I-95 forms a hairpin turn around Leonia to the southeast into Fort Lee and heads due south to Route 4. I-95 runs under the Edgewood Road Bridge here, an overpass that runs high above the highway, and is considered an iconic view for drivers entering New Jersey from the George Washington Bridge. After the overpass, I-95 runs in between the travel lanes of Route 4 as the freeway comes to a large interchange with southbound exits and northbound entrances for Route 4, US 1/9, US 46, and a full interchange with the southern terminus of US 9W (Fletcher Avenue), where the New Jersey Turnpike officially ends and the jurisdiction changes from the NJTA to the PANYNJ.[2]

I-95 southbound approaching split with US 1/9/US 46 past the George Washington Bridge in Fort Lee

Here, US 1/9/US 46 all join I-95 and the road continues southeast containing four local lanes and four express lanes in each direction, passing numerous highrise buildings through Fort Lee.[2][5] The road has a southbound exit and northbound entrance to Route 67 from the express lanes before coming to the northbound-only toll plaza for the George Washington Bridge. Past the toll plaza, there is a southbound exit and northbound entrance for the Palisades Interstate Parkway, also from the express lanes. After the Palisades Interstate Parkway, the road crosses high over Henry Hudson Drive, then the Hudson River on the George Washington Bridge, which has eight lanes total on the upper deck (the express lanes) and six lanes total on the lower deck (the local lanes).[2] US 46 terminates at the state border between New Jersey and New York, while I-95 and US 1-9 continue into upper Manhattan.

I-95 northbound just before leaving New Jersey via the George Washington Bridge

History[edit]

What became I-95 and I-295 around the northern part of Trenton was first legislated as part of Route 39, a route that was to run from the Yardley–Wilburtha Bridge around Trenton south to Hammonton.[11][12] Seven northeastern states from Virginia to Massachusetts including New Jersey proposed a limited-access highway in 1942 called the 7-State Highway; this was never built.[13] The New Jersey State Highway Department proposed Federal Aid Interstate Route 103 in 1956, and it was approved in 1957 by the Bureau of Public Roads (BPR).[14] At that time, the New Jersey Turnpike (mainline and Pennsylvania Extension) and George Washington Bridge had been completed; US 46 connected the north end of the New Jersey Turnpike to the bridge.[15][16][17] The BPR approved the planned alignment north of the Trenton area, which would have run generally northeast to exit 9 (Route 18) of the New Jersey Turnpike. From there, it would use the New Jersey Turnpike to its north end (exit 18, US 46) and a proposed freeway north to the planned I-80, then head east to the George Washington Bridge. The road was designated as part of I-95 in 1958.[14]

In the 1960s, the I-95 approach to the George Washington Bridge was completed, connecting to I-80 in Teaneck.[18] The portion of I-95 between the north end of the New Jersey Turnpike and I-80 opened in 1971.[19] Originally maintained by NJDOT, ownership of I-95 north of US 46 in Ridgefield Park was transferred to the NJTA in 1992 in order to balance the state budget, thus incorporating it as an extension of the turnpike.[9][20]

Routing through Central New Jersey: Somerset Freeway[edit]

Former I-95 southbound (now I-295 northbound) in Ewing Township

The location of I-95 in the Trenton area had not been finalized when the route was first designated. The BPR preferred using the Trenton Freeway (US 1 and Route 174), which was completed to Whitehead Road, but New Jersey and Pennsylvania proposed using the Scudder Falls Bridge and its approach (Route 129), opened in 1961 to Scotch Road, due in part to low design standards of the Trenton Freeway. As a result, I-95 was routed to use the Scudder Falls Bridge approach.[18][21] The approach to the Scudder Falls Bridge was extended in 1974, northeast to the planned interchange with the new I-95 freeway, and then east to US 1 as I-295.[21]

From the I-95/I-295 loop around Trenton, the free routing of I-95 in New Jersey, was to divert from the loop between the Route 31 and Federal City Road exits in Hopewell Township. Then, the highway was to intersect CR 546 and US 206 before coming to I-287 in Piscataway.[18] There was also meant to be a small connector roughly one mile (1.6 km) in length connecting I-95 with I-287 from the north and designated Interstate 695 (I-695).[22] (The I-695 designation, along with I-95's alignment in Piscataway, was dropped when I-695's own alignment became the preferred routing for I-95 to a full three-way interchange with I-287 in Franklin Township.[23][24])

At this point, the freeway would have continued northeastward through the western parts of Elizabeth and Newark, then terminate at the northern terminus of the New Jersey Turnpike at Ridgefield, but it was instead decided to route I-95 along the New Jersey Turnpike through North Jersey.[18][25]

The truncated route, known as the Somerset Freeway, was intended to terminate in Piscataway at I-287, and I-95 would have continued east along present day I-287 until it intersected with the New Jersey Turnpike in Edison Township.[18] The I-287 designation would probably have been truncated to begin at the junction with the Somerset Freeway. Both the Somerset Freeway and I-695 were projected to cost $55 million (equivalent to $384 million in 2023[26]) in 1967, with the cost increasing to $375 million (equivalent to $1.27 billion in 2023[26]) in 1979.[22][27] At this point, residents in Hopewell Township, Princeton, and Montgomery Township raised opposition out of the fear the Somerset Freeway would bring unwanted development to area farmland. The NJTA joined environmental and community groups in opposing the Somerset Freeway, as it would provide a toll-free alternative to the New Jersey Turnpike.[28][29] Due to this opposition, New Jersey Governor Brendan Byrne announced in 1980 that the state would not build the Somerset Freeway.[30] The US Congress officially canceled the Somerset Freeway by way of the Surface Transportation Assistance Act of 1982, rerouting I-95 south on the New Jersey Turnpike to exit 6, and onto its Pennsylvania Extension to end at the state line on the Delaware River–Turnpike Toll Bridge, pending the construction of an interchange where the Pennsylvania Turnpike crossed existing I-95 in Pennsylvania.[31] As a result of this cancelation, the federal government gave New Jersey $246 million (equivalent to $657 million in 2023[26]) for road projects in the area where the Somerset Freeway was to be built.[29]

In 1995, increasing truck traffic on US 206 and Route 31 motivated officials in Mercer County to have the state reconsider building the Somerset Freeway as a way to alleviate traffic on area roads. This option was ruled out due to a $700-million (equivalent to $1.28 billion in 2023[26]) pricetag.[32] Also around this time, I-95 was extended east along I-295 between the site of the Somerset Freeway interchange and US 1 in Lawrence Township.[33]

Filling the I-95 gap[edit]

View north along the New Jersey Turnpike in Hamilton Township, Mercer County. This was one of the southernmost I-95 signs on the mainline turnpike before the completion of I-95 in September 2018.

Due to the cancelation of the Somerset Freeway in 1983, a gap existed on I-95 within New Jersey for roughly 35 years.[13] Northbound I-95 ended at US 1 in Lawrence Township where the road became I-295.[34] Meanwhile, southbound I-95 entered New Jersey on the George Washington Bridge and continued along its present-day routing down the New Jersey Turnpike and across the Delaware River–Turnpike Toll Bridge, where the road became I-276 at the Pennsylvania state line.[2] Until this gap was filled, traffic from Pennsylvania was directed along I-95 northbound (to the Scudder Falls Bridge), then on its continuation as I-295 southbound until its interchange at I-195, which leads eastward to the New Jersey Turnpike.[35]

Before 2018, I-95 northbound abruptly became I-295 southbound in Lawrence Township. Signage directed drivers to continue south on I-295 and east on I-195 to reach I-95 northbound (New Jersey Turnpike).

In order to close the gap, an interchange was constructed between I-95 and the Pennsylvania Turnpike in Bristol Township, Pennsylvania. The interchange was first planned in the 1980s after the Somerset Freeway's cancelation.[36] As a result of this project, I-95 was rerouted from its former alignment in Pennsylvania and New Jersey to the easternmost part of the Pennsylvania Turnpike, replacing I-276 between the interchange and the Delaware River. In addition, I-295 was extended from its former northern terminus at US 1 westward (highway north) to the Scudder Falls Bridge and southward (highway west) through Pennsylvania to the new interchange. I-295 was initially chosen to be extended in this manner, but, in 2005, the plans were modified to extend I-195 from its current western terminus at I-295 and then north along I-295 and I-95 (bypassing Trenton) to the Scudder Falls Bridge and the new interchange.[37] On May 20, 2015, the plans were reverted to extend I-295 to the interchange.[38] The multiphased construction began in late 2010, and the approved design called for Stage 1 to tentatively end in 2020.[39] Groundbreaking for the interchange took place on July 30, 2013, with Pennsylvania Governor Tom Corbett in attendance.[40] In March 2018, I-95 was renumbered to I-295 between US 1 in Lawrence Township, New Jersey, and Taylorsville Road in Lower Makefield Township, Pennsylvania.[41] The redesignation that officially bridged the I-95 gap was made official on September 22, 2018, before the completion of Stage 1.[42][43]

Exit list[edit]

CountyLocationmi[2][3]kmExitDestinationsNotes
Delaware River0.000.00


I-95 south (Penn Turnpike) to I-276 west – Philadelphia
Continuation into Pennsylvania; eastern terminus of Pennsylvania Turnpike
Delaware River–Turnpike Toll Bridge (southbound toll gantry in Pennsylvania)
New JerseyPennsylvania line
BurlingtonFlorence Township2.614.20 US 130 – Florence, BurlingtonSouthbound entrance tolled
3.175.10Exit 6 Toll Plaza (southern end of ticket system)
Mansfield Township5.33–
6.50
8.58–
10.46

N.J. Turnpike south – Camden, Wilmington
South end of overlap with NJ Turnpike mainline; left exit southbound; exit 6 on NJ Turnpike
6.5010.46Southern end of dual carriageways (inner roadway for cars only and outer roadway for cars, trucks, and buses)
Bordentown Township7.9512.797 US 206 – Bordentown, TrentonExit numbers follow NJ Turnpike
MercerRobbinsville Township15.1524.387A I-195 – Trenton, Shore PointsExit 6 on I-195
East Windsor Township22.1235.608 Route 33 / Route 133 – Hightstown, Freehold
MiddlesexMonroe Township28.5145.888A
Route 32 to US 130 – Jamesburg, Cranbury
East Brunswick Township38.0761.279
Route 18 (CR 527) to US 1 – New Brunswick
Raritan River38.8962.59Basilone Bridge
Edison Township42.7368.7710

I-287 north / Route 440 north (CR 514) – Metuchen, Perth Amboy
Woodbridge Township45.6573.4711 G.S. Parkway / US 9 – Woodbridge, Shore PointsExit 129 on Garden State Parkway
Carteret50.5381.3212Carteret, RahwayAccess via CR 602
UnionElizabeth53.7586.5013 I-278 – Elizabeth, Staten IslandExit 3A on I-278
56.3390.6513A Newark Airport, Elizabeth SeaportAccess via Route 81 north
EssexNewark59.1995.2614-14C
I-78 to US 1-9 – Newark Airport, Bayonne, Jersey City, Holland Tunnel
Southbound exit and northbound entrance; singed as exits 14 (west to US 1-9) and 14A-C (east)
61.10–
61.30
98.33–
98.65



I-95 north (Route 95W north) to I-280 / Route 3 – Meadowlands Sports Complex, George Washington Bridge
Southern terminus of Route 95W (Western Spur); northbound exit and southbound entrance
61.5299.0115E


US 1-9 Truck north (Raymond Boulevard east) / US 1-9 south (Pulaski Skyway) – Newark, Jersey City
Signed for US 1-9 Truck northbound, US 1-9 southbound; once through toll booth, ramp also provides direct exits to Doremus Avenue and Raymond Boulevard west
HudsonKearny63.18101.6815W
I-280 west – Newark, Kearny
Southbound exit and northbound entrance
Secaucus65.30105.0915XSecaucusAccess to Secaucus Junction
67.23108.2016E
Route 495 east (Lincoln Tunnel)
Western terminus of Route 495; northbound exit and southbound entrance
67.64108.86Exit 16E Toll Plaza (northern end of ticket system)
67.60108.7917
Route 3 / Route 495 east (Lincoln Tunnel) – Secaucus
Tolled southbound exit; no northbound access to Route 495; exit number not signed northbound
BergenRidgefield70.98114.23Vince Lombardi Service Area
71.33114.79
I-80 west – Paterson
Eastern terminus of I-80; northbound left exit and southbound entrance

I-95 south / Turnpike south (Route 95W south)
Northern terminus of Route 95W (Western Spur); southbound exit and northbound entrance
Ridgefield Park72.31116.3768 US 46 – The Ridgefields, Palisades ParkExit numbers based on I-80 mileage; no exit number northbound; no northbound entrance; last southbound exit before toll
72.48116.65Challenger RoadNorthbound exit and entrance
Ridgefield ParkTeaneck Township line73.07117.59
I-95 north (Express Lanes) / George Washington Bridge Upper Level – All Trucks to New York
Southern terminus of Express lanes; left exit and entrance
Teaneck Township73.59118.4369

I-80 west to G.S. Parkway – Hackensack, Paterson
Eastern terminus of I-80; southbound exit and northbound entrance
74.10119.2570Leonia, TeaneckVia local lanes only; signed as exits 70A (Leonia) and 70B (Teaneck) northbound; access via CR 56
Englewood75.58121.6371EnglewoodVia local lanes only; northbound exit and southbound entrance; access via Broad Avenue
Fort Lee

I-95 Toll north (Express Lanes) / George Washington Bridge Upper Level – All Trucks to New York
Northbound exit only





I-95 Express south / N.J. Turnpike south to I-80 / G.S. Parkway – Paterson
Southern terminus of Upper Level lanes, northern terminus of southbound Express Lanes; southbound exit only
76.2–
76.53
122.6–
123.16
72A
Route 4 west – Paramus
Eastern terminus of Route 4; southbound exit and northbound entrance
76.62–
76.66
123.31–
123.37
72B

US 1-9 south / US 46 west – Palisades Park

N.J. Turnpike ends
South end of US 1-9 / US 46 overlap; southbound exit and northbound entrance; northern terminus of NJ Turnpike & concurrency with it
76.66123.37South end of PANYNJ jurisdiction
77.02123.9572
US 9W north to Palisades Parkway – Fort Lee
No southbound exit
Module:Jctint/USA warning: Unused argument(s): state
77.18124.2173


US 9W north to Route 67 (Lemoine Avenue) / Palisades Parkway – Fort Lee
Signed only as "Route 67 (Lemoine Ave.) – Fort Lee" northbound; signed as exits 73-74 southbound
US 9 north to Upper LevelNorth end of US 9 overlap; northbound exit only; northern terminus of Express Lanes, southern terminus of northbound Upper Level lanes; all trucks must exit here
Hudson River77.96125.46George Washington Bridge (northbound toll; E-ZPass or Toll by Mail)

US 46 ends
New JerseyNew York line


I-95 north (US 1 north to US 9) to I-87 – New England, Long Island
Continuation into New York City as the Trans-Manhattan Expressway
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

Western Spur[edit]

CountyLocationmi[3]kmExitDestinationsNotes
EssexNewark0.0000.000

I-95 south / N.J. Turnpike south – Trenton
Southern terminus of the Western Spur (Route 95W)
0.701.1314-14C
I-78 to US 1-9 – Newark Airport, Bayonne, Jersey City, Holland Tunnel
Southbound exit and northbound entrance; singed as exits 14 (west to US 1-9) and 14A-C (east)
1.151.8515E
US 1-9 south – Newark, Jersey City
Southbound exit and northbound entrance
HudsonKearny3.084.9615W
I-280 west – Newark, Kearny
Eastern terminus of I-280
BergenEast Rutherford7.0211.3016W Route 3 – Secaucus, RutherfordAccess to MetLife Stadium
Carlstadt7.1811.56Exit 16W Toll Plaza (northern end of ticket system)
8.47–
8.95
13.63–
14.40
19WMeadowlands Complex, American DreamNo northbound exit; E-ZPass only toll for the southbound exit and northbound entrance
Ridgefield10.13–
10.43
16.30–
16.79
Vince Lombardi Service Area
11.0117.72
I-80 west – Paterson
Eastern terminus of I-80; northbound left exit and southbound entrance
11.2618.12

I-95 north / N.J. Turnpike north / US 46 jct. – George Washington Bridge
Northern terminus of the Western Spur (Route 95W)
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

Express Lanes and G.W. Bridge Upper Level Lanes[edit]

The entire route is in Bergen County.

Locationmi[2]kmExitDestinationsNotes
Ridgefield ParkTeaneck Township line73.07117.59


I-95 south / N.J. Turnpike south to US 46 – Newark
Southern terminus of Express lanes
Teaneck Township73.59118.4369

I-80 west (Express Lanes) to G.S. Parkway – Paterson
Eastern terminus of I-80 Express; southbound exit and northbound entrance
Fort Lee76.2–
76.53
122.6–
123.16
72A
Route 4 west – Paramus
I-95 / N.J. Turnpike (Local Lanes)


To I-80 / G.S. Parkway – Hackensack
Southern terminus of Upper Level lanes, northern terminus of southbound Express Lanes; no southbound exit
76.62–
76.66
123.31–
123.37
72B

US 1-9 south / US 46 west – Palisades Park

N.J. Turnpike ends
South end of US 1-9 / US 46 overlap southbound and US 1 / US 46 overlap northbound; southbound exit and northbound entrance; northern terminus of NJ Turnpike & concurrency with it
76.66123.37South end of PANYNJ jurisdiction
77.18124.2173
Route 67 / US 9W to Palisades Parkway – Fort Lee
Palisades Pkwy. not signed southbound, US 9W not signed northbound; southbound exit ramp also provides access to Hudson Terrace and Center Avenue
US 9Northbound entrance only; south end of US 9 overlap northbound; northern terminus of Express Lanes, southern terminus of northbound Upper Level lanes
77.53124.7774
Palisades Parkway north
Southbound exit and northbound entrance
Hudson River77.96125.46George Washington Bridge (northbound toll; E-ZPass or Toll by Mail)

US 46 ends
New JerseyNew York line


I-95 north (US 1-9 north) to I-87
Continuation into New York City as the Trans-Manhattan Expressway
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Starks, Edward (January 27, 2022). "Table 1: Main Routes of the Dwight D. Eisenhower National System of Interstate and Defense Highways". FHWA Route Log and Finder List. Federal Highway Administration. Retrieved December 24, 2023.
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w New Jersey Department of Transportation. "Interstate 95 straight line diagram" (PDF). Trenton: New Jersey Department of Transportation. Retrieved March 17, 2020.
  3. ^ a b c d e f g New Jersey Department of Transportation. "Interstate 95W straight line diagram" (PDF). Trenton: New Jersey Department of Transportation. Retrieved March 17, 2020.
  4. ^ a b c Travel Boards. "New Jersey Interchanges & Service Areas". Travel Boards. Retrieved January 26, 2010.
  5. ^ a b c d e f g h i j Google (January 26, 2010). "Overview Map of I-95 in New Jersey (Main Section)" (Map). Google Maps. Google. Retrieved January 26, 2010.
  6. ^ a b c New Jersey Turnpike Authority. "Class 1 Passenger Cars Toll Schedule" (PDF). Woodbridge: New Jersey Turnpike Authority. Retrieved January 26, 2010.
  7. ^ Google (January 26, 2010). "Street View Signage on US 206 Ramp to New Jersey Turnpike" (Map). Google Maps. Google. Retrieved January 26, 2010.
  8. ^ "Work Begins to Widen Jersey Turnpike". The Intelligencer. Doylestown, PA. Associated Press. July 3, 2009.
  9. ^ a b Romano, Jay (April 7, 1991). "Florio Plan to Sell Roads Is Criticized". The New York Times. Retrieved January 26, 2010.
  10. ^ "Interstate 80 - Bergen-Passaic Expressway". East Coast Roads. Retrieved August 24, 2023.
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External links[edit]

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Interstate 95
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